While this year’s winter has been milder than usual because of an especially strong El Nino, that shouldn’t stop residents in Schaumburg, Illinois, from continually monitoring and maintaining their home heating system. In fact, with the new year upon us, homeowners should take this time to conduct a check to ensure their heating component works properly. When checking items like ‘changing the filter’ off the list, also keep in mind the common myths associated with guarding your home’s indoor environment against nature’s outdoor elements.

Raising the Temperature on the Thermostat Will Heat Your Home Faster

One of the most common misconceptions that many homeowners have is that raising the thermostat to 80 or 90 degrees will help heat their home faster. To dispel this myth, one must consider how a thermostat works. A thermostat turns on when your home’s temperature falls below the setting and turns off when it’s above it. A thermostat doesn’t control the amount of heat your HVAC system produces and pumps into your home.

Running the Ceiling Fan is a Waste of Energy in the Winter

We all know how good of a friend a ceiling fan can be when the summer temperatures break into the 90s in Illinois, but when used properly, it can also work wonders during the winter. Unfortunately, many homeowners forget about their ceiling fans when the cold weather arrives. To take advantage of your ceiling fan, simply flick the switch on the fan so that it spins clockwise. The fan will then force the warm air that has risen to the ceiling down to the ground, making you feel warmer while helping lower your heating bills.

Using Duct Tape to Seal Air Leaks Works Well

While there are plenty of clever uses for duct tape, sealing your ducts isn’t one of them. Instead, seal your air leaks by using a mastic sealant or a metal tape. Since some spaces might be hard to access, consider calling a professional HVAC contractor to help with ensuring your home is protected from the elements.

For more information about how to improve your home heating or prepare for a winter storm, check out this blog or contact us 847-637-5287.

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